Remember Twitter screenshots can be faked

Recently on Twitter there was an example of a journalist being called out for having sent an unpleasant tweet to someone. It soon became clear that they hadn’t sent it – it was a fabrication sent from a very new account which shortly afterwards disappeared entirely. It was a smear attempt.

There was some discussion about the increase in faked screenshots (they’ve always been around but mostly used in a jokey way until recently) and also about the ways in which screenshots can be manipulated.

Here are some suggested possibilities, although all are functional methods they’re also all speculative as we’ve no idea how the person created the malicious tweet.

Although this post does give information about how to fake tweets or how to fake screenshots the intention isn’t to encourage anyone to do this but to make people more aware of the possibility and to treat screenshotted tweets with some caution, and not to assume the worst. You might also like my post on Twitter forensics.

1. Combining images
A fake account could send a genuine tweet and the screenshot of its text could be overlaid on the area occupied by a real tweet from the ‘target’ account. The fake tweet might then be deleted to reduce the chance of it being discovered and raising suspicion.

2. Image / text manipulation
Things like Photoshop / Word / PowerPoint could be used to generate new text that matches the appearance of a tweet (type / font size etc) and be used to create a fake tweet from scratch.

3. Editing the appearance of the tweet on-screen, then taking a screenshot of that
I remember seeing a tweet warning about this being a possibility but couldn’t remember what it said so I asked Twitter and Sean Ellis confirmed that this was possible, so I tried this out myself on Firefox and it’s quite easy to do (I assume it’s more or less the same for other browsers but haven’t checked).

With a tweet open on the browser so that its URL is visible in the address bar you can open the Inspector panel (Command+Alt/Option+i on a Mac) and re-write the tweet that appears in front of you. It won’t change the actual real published tweet, just what’s on your screen. But you can screenshot it and it looks real.

Search in the Inspector window for a phrase that appears within your tweet’s text. I found five examples of it but only the one that referenced TweetTextSize was the one that let me edit it.

a) The actual tweet (below)

b) Screenshot of the real tweet (below)

Screenshot 2018-08-30 20.12.09

c) View of the tweet online with Inspector window open. I’ve searched for the word discoveries which appears towards the end of the tweet (you might need to search for a word that appears earlier if the text is truncated – there were 3 instances of discoveries but 5 of bowels!)

Note the smaller text below the tweet where I’ve written different text, it says “You can write anything in here and when I click back in the tweet it will show up there too. This is a fake tweet screenshot made for illustrative purposes.”

Screenshot 2018-08-30 20.10.10

d) Screenshot of the fake tweet (below)

Screenshot 2018-08-30 20.10.29

Sean also pointed out that you could probably download a local copy of any web page, manipulate the underlying HTML code in notepad and reload a local copy and take a screenshot. There seem to be a lot of ways of cheating!

4. Faking a ‘deleted tweet’
If you add extra numbers to the end of a tweet’s URL / link you are effectively creating a tweet that has never been published. When pressing enter, to open the tweet, Twitter will return a ‘page not found’ error page. It looks as if the person has deleted the tweet but it never existed.

Here’s an example I created for myself using two numbers repeated to make it clear what I did.

https://twitter.com/JoBrodie/status/121212121212121212121212121212121212

It looks like this on the page.

Screenshot 2018-08-29 23.48.59

Featured image from Pixabay

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Taking a screenshot

This was originally posted on my main blog ‘How to take screenshots‘ which I’ve copied here and edited slightly.

  1. How take a screenshot on a Windows desktop PC or laptop
  2. …on a Mac laptop
  3. …on an iPhone
  4. …on an Android phone (v4.0 and above)
  5. …on a Samsung S3 Mini
  6. …on a Windows 8.1 phone
  7. …on a Sony phone
  8. Including the visible URL on a desktop

1. How take a screenshot on a Windows desktop PC or laptop
• Look for ‘Print Screen’ on the keyboard which is likely to be spelled Prt Scr.
• Press it to take a picture of the entire screen or press the Alt key first and then Prt Scr to take a snapshot of just the active window.
• This silently copies an image of the screen, or part of it, to the clipboard (it doesn’t send it to the printer)

I always use the free Paint / Paintbrush picture editing tool that’s bundled with Windows and the ‘how to use’ that is probably the subject of a different post but – briefly – Ctrl+V will transfer the copied image from the desktop and paste it into the Paint editing window, then click on any of the tool options then click on the selection tool.

To select the bit you want to keep start at one bit (eg top left) and click and drag to cover the area of interest. Press Ctrl+C to copy that (it’s now in the clipboard) and you can put that in a Word document or email, or save it as an image by opening a new Paint document (Ctrl+N) and then Ctrl+V to paste your clipping in and then save it.

2. How to take a screenshot on a Mac laptop

Note that ‘Command’ = the ⌘ key
Command+Shift+3     Capture the entire screen to a file
Command+Shift+Control+3     Capture the screen to the Clipboard
Command+Shift+4     Capture a selection to a file
Command+Shift+Control+4     Capture a selection to the Clipboard
Source: http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1343

You can use the Preview tool (free with Macs) to do some basic editing of the image.

3. How to take a screenshot on an iPhone
Press the on/off button (at the top right) and the ‘home screen’ button at the bottom. This will copy whatever’s on your screen to your camera roll which you can then email to yourself (private) or upload to image sharing services (public).

4. How to take a screenshot on an Android phone (v4.0 and above)
Press and hold the power and ‘volume down’ buttons simultaneously – h/t @ErisianLib
More at http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/how-to/google-android/3446798/how-take-screenshot-on-android-phones-tablets/

5. How to take a screenshot on a Samsung S3 Mini
Press and hold the ‘home’ and ‘on/off’ (power) button simultaneously – thanks to @Jackpot73 for the info. 

6. How to take a screenshot on a Windows 8.1 phone
Press ‘power button’ and ‘volume increase/up’ at the same time – info from @Flatsquid, thank you

7. How to take a screenshot on a Sony phone
It’s power and volume down simultaneously, according to @clangyandjammy – thanks

8. Including the visible URL on a desktop
On desktop computers you may want to INCLUDE a page’s (eg a tweet’s) URL which you can see in the address bar, but you might NOT want to display your bookmarks too. If so you can use the VIEW option in the browser to temporarily hide the bookmarks toolbar (and any other toolbars) to neaten the captured image. You can also resize the entire window and use the Ctrl+- (the Ctrl or Command* key plus the hyphen key) to reduce the size of the text on the screen. Ctrl++ (Ctrl / Command and the + key) to embiggen it again 🙂

*Command = for Mac keyboards