How to create bookmarks / anchor tags on Google Docs documents

Sometimes you want to link within a document so that when you click a link you leap to the relevant bit without having to scroll, this can easily be done in Google Docs using the Bookmark facility. On web pages it’s usually known as anchors.

The thing buried at the bottom of your document that you will bookmark is ‘the pointee’ and the link in your table of contents that points to it is ‘the pointer’. The pointer points to the pointee 🙂

Quick ‘tl;dr’ instructions

  1. Select your Pointee (the bit of area you want to point to), click Insert » Bookmark
  2. Select Pointer (text that will hyperlink to it), click Insert » Link and expand the Bookmarks section, to select your bookmark. Done!
  3. An example here: make a copy of this document to edit and try it yourself.

 

Detailed instructions with pictures

  1. Select the text of the Pointee. It could just be the first word in a heading or paragraph, or a full sentence.
    01 Select the Pointee
  2. From the menu at the top click Insert » Bookmark, it will then have a little blue flag next to it.
  3. Select the text of the Pointer. That could be a word or phrase in a table of contents, or any word or phrase that you want to make clickable so that clicking it takes the reader to the pointe04 Select the text of The Pointer
  4. Click Insert » Link, then expand the Bookmarks sections (it’ll have just one bookmark in it for now) and select the one you’ve previously created. Click Apply.
    05 Insert a Link
    06 Expand the Bookmarks
    07 Click Apply
  5. Go to your pointer, click on its new link, it will pop up a “where you’re going to be taken to” tiny window, click on the link again and off you go.
    08 Click the Pointer link
  6. Try it out yourself, make a copy of this document and edit it.

 

 

 

It doesn’t seem to be possible to send Tweets-with-images to Instagram (easy in reverse)? Can it be done?

Is it possible to post a Tweet and have it appear automatically on Instagram and have the tweeted image show up in Instagram too?1 If so, how?

A friend wanted to know if it’s possible / straightforward to post a Tweet (that contains an image) and have it appear on Instagram (with image showing). I spent some time trying to set it up for her and not succeeding. After reasonably extensive searching on Google, forums, Quora, IFTTT (for a ready-made recipe) and looking at blog posts highlighting potential workarounds etc we drew a blank and it seems that it’s not a straightforward thing. We’re not technical enough to faff about with Twitter’s API. We also assume we can’t be the first people to have tried this.

Instagram to Twitter
It is easy to do the reverse (Instagram to Twitter) but you need a third party intermediate, like IFTTT (If This Then That), for an image to show up in the tweet itself because Twitter doesn’t naturally show Instagram pictures as pictures2 just as links.

A tweeted picture of beautiful pink tulips posted via Instagram linked to Twitter via IFTTT

Above: this is a screenshot of the tweet linked below (in case it renders incorrectly on any given browser). It shows a picture appearing in the tweet and a link to view the pic on Instagram.

I’d assumed it would be straightforward to reverse the IFTTT ‘recipe’ so that a posted tweet could be reposted at Instagram (but only where a particular hashtag was used, to prevent all my friend’s tweets appearing as Instaposts!).

The reason she wanted to do it from Instagram to Twitter is in part because she prefers to use a laptop and you cant upload an image to Instagram from a laptop (also it’s easier to type the accompanying text with a keyboard). Also Insta to Twitter via IFTTT truncates part of the message if too long.

I use IFTTT as the intermediary between Twitter and Instagram so that every photo I post to Instagram is automatically tweeted out and, importantly, shows up as an image and not just as a link. Without using IFTTT you can connect Twitter to Instagram (eg directly from your phone’s settings) and the same will happen, but no photo will appear.

Footnotes

1 I think this wouldn’t be possible if the tweet contained a link because links in Twitter only show up as an image if the Twitter Card has been set up (you can check any link with Twitter’s Card Validator). Instagram is a different platform and doesn’t support Twitter cards anyway (see [2]).

2 “Last week [written in 2012], Facebook-owned Instagram decided to turn off support for Twitter Card functionality for its photos. Basically, you would no longer see the full images; rather, you’d see a cropped version.” TechCrunch). Without a third party app you just see a link to view the post on Instagram, with the app you see a picture in the tweet.

How to create a Twitter Moment from yours or others’ tweets – it’s a bit like Storify

atl;dr – gathering a bunch of Tweets onto a single page for ease of reading and sharing, via a web browser (don’t think you can do this on a phone).

Note, the instructions below are for using “#NewTwitter” (which has been around for some time now). If you are using the Good Twitter browser add-on to make your Twitter look the same as it did before they rolled out the new look then you can use Twitter’s instructions (which are now slightly out of date) and you will stil be able to create a new Moment from the down arrow to the right of any tweet, which New Twitter doesn’t enable.

  1. Open the moments editing window
  2. Create a new moment
  3. Add in content
    This is where you can also create a private moment that’s visible only to people who have the link.
  4. Using search to find tweets
    1. 4a. Using search to find older tweets
    2. 4b. Finding tweets that quote tweet another tweet (ie not replies)
  5. Adding tweets
    1. 5a. Adding a tweet to your moment
    2. 5b. Adding a tweet via its link
  6. Ordering the tweets in your moment
  7. Adding images to your moment
  8. Publish or save your moment for later
  9. Edit your moment after publishing
  10. Delete your moment
  11. Finding a tweet’s link / URL

Background
We don’t have Storify anymore, there are alternatives but nothing works as well as Storify did. Twitter’s own version is… adequate (and you can only collect tweets whereas Storify let you add in anything that could be embedded).

Isn’t it just the same as a thread?
Yes-ish, but it’s all on one page and you don’t have to click to view other tweets that Twitter’s randomly hidden.

What will you collect?
Just tweets. You might use this to collect together some of your own tweets, other people’s tweets that you’ve favourited or a bunch of tweets on a topic. You can also add the tweet by its link / URL (that’s very helpful) so if it’s an older tweet you can search for it first using Twitter’s  advanced search and copy the link / URL into your Moment. (See detailed bit on [Finding a tweet’s link / URL] below).

So in the absence of Storify re-appearing, here’s how to use Moments.

Instructions
1. Open the Moments editing window
Open the Moments editing window by clicking on the blue circle with 3 dots below your avatar, then click on Moments in the menu that pops up. You can also access it by changing my name to yours in this link https://twitter.com/JoBrodie/moments

Open the Moment editing window

If you’re using the Good Twitter add-on you’ll still have a Moments tab so you can access it that way.

2. Create a new moment
You’ll see your Moments page (mine shows two Moments I’ve previously created) and the ‘create new moment’ icon is highlighted with a yellow arrow.

The Moments landing page

3. Add in content
At the top of the new page the blue bar lets you sort tweets by oldest or newest first, and lets you save [Finish later] or [Publish]. You can re-find your partially completed Moment by following Instruction #1 above. The [••• More] option on the left lets you mark if your Moment will contain sensitive material and you can also choose to share your location with Twitter (or not) though your location is not published. You can also create a private moment with the ‘Make Moment link only’ which you can then share with people privately and it won’t be published on your profile or show up to people who don’t have the link.

Starting your Moment on Twitter

Give your moment a title and description. Once you’ve added a few tweets you’ll be able to select one that has a photo to do the [Set cover] option in the middle, or you can upload an image (here are some free ones from Pixabay).

The Add Tweets to your Moment panel at the bottom has four options:

  1. Tweets you’ve liked (your favorites) – this is the default option so you’ll just see your favourites and can click on the tick symbol next to any you want to add
  2. Tweets from a particular account (could be your own) – start typing the name of an account and when it appears in the autosuggest pop-up click on it
  3. Tweets that you find via search – you can use operators like from:username or to:username to narrow things down. You could also create a search string in advanced search and copy it into the search box.
  4. Tweets where you know its link / URL – you could also use Twitter’s  advanced search and copy the tweet’s link into the Moment (see [Finding a tweet’s link / URL] below). Once you have the link just paste it in to the box, pressing enter will add it to the moment (unless it’s already there in which case the option is greyed out).

4a. Using search to find older tweets
If the tweet you’re after doesn’t show up with a basic search (or if the tweet is quite old) you might need to hunt for it using search operators in the Moment’s search bar to target it. For example this would bring up all the tweets I sent mentioning biscuits in 2017 »biscuits from:jobrodie since:2017-01-01 until:2017-12-31« (see the results for this search).

You can run the search either in Twitter’s moments and add the tweets from there, or in the main Twitter search bar and copy the link into the moment.

4b. Finding tweets that quote tweet another tweet
People often quote tweet a tweet rather than reply to it, which means that not all responses will show up as replies or in the thread. You can check if a tweet has been quote tweeted by searching Twitter for its link, just put the whole URL (eg https:// twitter .com / username / status/ 0123456789 without spaces) into Twitter’s search and press enter. All the tweets that have quote tweeted it will show up (quote tweeting is logically identical to writing a tweet and pasting in another tweet’s link). See instruction #11 for how to find a tweet’s link in its timestamp.

5a. Adding a Tweet to your Moment
The tick symbol next to any tweet will let you add it to the Moment. In the picture below I’ve added the second tweet which emerged when I ran the targeted search for tweets I’d sent in 2017 about biscuits (!).

Adding a Tweet to a Moment using the Tick symbol.png

5b. Adding a tweet via its link
The link / URL of the other biscuit-themed tweet is below…

https://twitter.com/JoBrodie/status/909517501297577984

…pasting that into the

Add tweets to a moment by their link 1 of 2.png

Add tweets to a moment by their link 2 of 2.png

If Tweet is already there you get this alert.png

If you try and add a tweet that’s already there it’ll let you know.

6. Ordering the tweets in your moment
You can also use the up and down arrows to re-order the tweets in your moment but use the option at the top of the page if you want to re-order the whole thing in chronological (or reverse chronological) order. You can remove any tweet from your moment by clicking on the X next to it.

Move up or down with the arrows and delete with the X.png

7. Adding images to your Moment
Click on the Set Cover button near the top of the page. If your moment contains tweets with images then these pictures will show up and you can pick one. There’s also the + option to upload an image from your computer.

Set Cover image 1 of 2.png

Set Cover image 2 of 2 - uploading an image.png

Once you’ve chosen your cover image you’ll likely be immediately taken to an editing page and given the option to create cropped versions for people viewing on mobiles or tablets. You can move the image around in the panel on the left and you’ll see what it will look like cropped in the view on the right. Fiddle about with it until you’re happy, then press Apply. Or choose not to crop it for mobile (I’m not really sure what happens in that case!).

On the main Moment page you can also select any other images and crop them, the icon looks like this –

Crop for mobile.png

8. Publish or save your Moment for later
Once you’ve had enough Moment-ing you can either publish it or save it for later. Publishing just means that it’s visible to everyone else if they happen to look at your Moments page (mine’s https://twitter.com/JoBrodie/moments). A suggested tweet will appear inviting you to share this fact to your followers – it’s editable, or deletable / ignorable if you don’t want to publish it.

If you come back to publishing it later, go to your Moments page, click on the Moment you want to publish, look for three of these ••• to the right of its title, click on that and EDIT is the second option. That lets you edit and then publish your Moment.

At this point Twitter might suggest that you crop any images you’ve missed, for mobile viewers, or you can ignore that suggestion and publish anyway.

Twitter may ask you to crop other images if not already done before publishing the moment but you can ignore it.png
You can ignore and publish anyway.

Ready to publish your moment.png

Share this moment - it is optional.png
Once you’ve pressed ‘Publish’ (see pic above) an optional, editable tweet is presented to you which you can amend and send or dismiss with the X if you don’t want to share it (unless you’ve made it a secret moment it will be publicly visible on your Moments profile though).

9. Edit your moment after publishing
You can also edit a Moment retrospectively and it will be updated in real time. Follow Step #1 to bring up your list of moments, click on the moment you want to edit and look for the three dots •••, you will find Edit (also Delete) among the options.

Three dots.png

Delete or edit a moment.png

Click Edit and you will be taken to the editing window and there’ll be an alert to remind you that any changes you make are automatically updated.

Editing moment - alert.png

10. How to delete a moment
As for #9 but choose Delete instead of Edit. You can’t undo it (though deleting it doesn’t delete any of the original tweets so you can remake it).

11. Finding a tweet’s link / URL
Any Tweet’s URL / link can be found in its timestamp. In the pic below you can right-click on the time-since-tweet-sent link highlighted by a green pointer and use the browser option to copy the link location, then paste it into the relevant bit in instruction #5b. Twitter has its own thing, in the down-arrow menu highlighted by a yellow pointer, which lets you embed the tweet. That opens up a new tab and auto-scrolls down the page to a section on embedding, but if you scroll back upwards you can copy and paste the link written plainly and in full. The green arrow version is much quicker (and many things will let you embed a tweet just from its link alone, without needing a bit of code – but if you need the code you can find it there).

Where to get the URL for a Tweet - timestamp or down arrow

Happy Moment-ing!

I came across this fairly random biscuit tweet of mine which I thought I’d end with 🙂

 

Twitter will let users decide who can reply to their tweets – no idea how that could even work

Three potential workarounds that may thwart this
1. Wait for someone in a ‘panel tweet’ to reply and reply to them
2. Quote tweet the original tweet
3. Send a fresh tweet mentioning the original person

As is often the case I look forward to being proved wrong 😉

 


 

Twitter announces it’s going to let you limit who can reply to your tweet
At the recent Consumer Electronics Show conference Twitter’s Suzanne Xie said that the company planned to allow people to decide, before sending a tweet, who could reply to it. Apparently it will be possible to pick who gets to be in your conversation by selecting one of four options – Statement (a tweet to which no-one can reply), Panel – only those named within the tweet can reply, Group – as for Panel plus anyone the sender follows and Global – anyone can reply. This is intended to increase the health of conversations by reducing unpleasant interactions. The idea had also come up in an October 2019 interview with Kayvon Beykpour by The Verge.

But can it work?
I can’t help wondering if this is one of those things that sounds helpful but isn’t that great in practice. Surely this could only work as intended if the settings applied to the originating tweet are applied to the whole thread, otherwise people replying to others’ replies will wreck this. I can see the following scenario happening.

Can other people reply to the replyers?
Let’s imagine you send a Panel or Group tweet. I can’t reply to your tweet because I’m not in that panel / group. Someone who is in your chosen gang can reply and does so. If I am not blocked by them then I can reply to them. My reply is now in your thread. If you’ve blocked me then you won’t see it (everyone else will) but you may see any replies sent to me that include you.

I just have to wait for someone (that I can reply to) to reply first. Or I can quote tweet it (quoted tweets show up in notifications so you’ll see my ‘reply’ that way unless you’ve blocked me).

Me being able to reply to your replyer would seem to wreck Twitter’s reply-tweaking options unless the restriction (that you applied to your first tweet) is cascaded to the whole thread.

You can certainly set things so that you see notifications only from the people you follow, though that doesn’t stop those people from being able to reply. You can also, or will soon be able to, hide people’s replies (I don’t know how well this works if they have blocked you though).

Seeking more information from Twitter
I’ve asked Suzanne Xie and Kayvon Beykpour (from Twitter) how this will work and will add further info here if I get any. Interestingly they both started using Twitter in 2008 (a month before I joined) and have tweeted fewer than 7,000 tweets so they are not particularly heavy users. I do sometimes wonder if Twitter staff are particularly familiar with their own product…

A parallel with the block function
A similar ‘security theatre’ operates with blocks. Twitter implies that if Lydia blocks Kitty then Kitty cannot (a) see or (b) reply to Lydia’s tweets. Kitty only has to log out to solve (a) but it’s true that she can’t reply directly to Kitty’s tweet. But if Lizzie replies to Lydia (and Lizzie hasn’t blocked Kitty) then Kitty can reply to Lizzie and her tweet is now in Lydia’s thread, though Lydia won’t see the reply from Kitty. She can probably infer what was said from other replies though.

What have others said about the reply-limiting news?
There are lots of people who are pleased about this and think it a good idea. A point raised by Kayvon Beykpour was that it might help live Twitter chats by limiting who could contribute (see Social Media Today link below), though there have been third party apps that have helped with that in the past.

Where people have been less enthusiastic commenters have wondered if this is just going to let people post misleading opinions that can’t be directly challenged, as caeser_pounce put it “Finally public figures will be protected from criticism“. Twitter suggests the quote tweet option for such responses, which appear in the sender’s notifications, though quoted tweets don’t self-thread into the original thread as a reply would1.

It would also reduce “getting ratioed” (when replies exceed likes and RTs by some magnitude) which is no fun for the ratioee but informative for anyone looking at the tweet as they can see the volume of disagreement.

I have assumed (see my 3rd tweet above) that people can just create a new message and use that to reply to someone, so wondered what this feature will actually prevent in terms of negative interactions.

Shenmaxiu pointed out that there’ll be more screenshots posted which doesn’t necessarily help people using screen readers (don’t forget to switch on the option to add descriptions to your screenshots or images) or those on flakier connections.

Alain-Christian suggests that if a tweet has its replies restricted then that should also restrict who can see it in the first place and safindlay1980 can’t see the point of receiving statements in their timeline from people who don’t want their views challenged and would like the option to switch these off.

TarekOmarNafee wonders if it will apply to polls, restricting who can vote.

Notes
1 You could take the URL of your quote tweet and put it in a tweet in a reply somewhere in the thread (if it’s possible for you or someone else to reply). Example.

Further reading (articles from 8 or 9 January 2020)

 

A neat trick for closing a roll of wrapping paper

I learned this trick when working at the London Brass Rubbing Centre in the Crypt of St Martin in the Fields in 1995 when I was 25. It was a lovely job, helping people make wax-on-paper rubbings of various facsimile brasses. I learned a lot about monumental* brasses and about heraldry more generally (also discovered the word ‘fleam’). I also ate a LOT of delicious apple crumble from the cafe and was a captive audience for the bookshop’s CD of the week / month. We had a lot of Riverdance and Hildegard von Bingen pretty much on loop.

Anyway when someone’s made a rubbing and wants to roll it up to take it home you can do this to keep it safe, and it also works for wrapping paper.

  1. Cut a strip of paper that is slightly longer than the circumference of the rolled paper
  2. Have some tape to hand
  3. Roll the wrapping paper or rubbing so that it’s closed.
  4. Insert into the cut end your strip of paper so that it’s poking out at 90 degrees, then roll it all the way round so that it overlaps itself
  5. Tape the overlap
  6. Write a smug instructional blog post 🙂

wrapping paper how to close with strip of paper - a useful trick or hack

*they are both memorial and armorial!

How to scrub your Twitter timeline of iffy Tweets – for potential politicians etc

Note that I use the Good Twitter browser add-on to make Twitter look and behave how it used to before the recent big changes, so my screenshots may not match yours.

Every so often someone finds an old tweet from a political candidate which embarrasses them and in some cases wrecks their chance of being selected, or elected. It might well be for the best that these are uncovered, so people know what they’re dealing with, but this post looks at ways of deleting old and embarrassing tweets.

I’d assumed that political parties would have prepared some sort of Advice to Potential Candidates on handling previous social media posts, but the continued re-publication of people’s earlier dodgy tweets suggests otherwise. I’d also have assumed that there would be some sort of Reputation Management companies that could help with this. Maybe there are and people are failing to take advantage.

Table of Contents

  1. Before you delete
  2. How to delete a Tweet / undo a ReTweet
  3. Search for the unwise Tweets you’ve sent

1. Before you delete

The point of deleting a dodgy old Tweet is to hide something that you once said and either now disagree with, or still agree with it but would rather pretend you didn’t. Deleting such Tweets is therefore largely an exercise in dishonesty and self-preservation – I’m sure you’ll go far in politics 🙂

Keep copies: It’s probably a good idea to take and keep a screenshot (how to do that) of anything you’re going to delete, perhaps including the URL / address if you’re able. I’d also recommend taking screenshot copies of the conversation thread if it’s in one, for context. Be aware that someone else may already have a screencap of your Tweet and taken out of context it may look much worse.

Will your deletions be flagged?: Politwoops UK (there are versions for several countries) records whenever a politician deletes a Tweet and if your account is being monitored then a copy of the Tweet and when you deleted it will live on there.

Tweets you send and delete seconds later may be noted: If someone is viewing Twitter via a web browser and if they leave the tab open then a build up of tweets gives a note like this, clicking on it brings up the waiting Tweets that arrived but weren’t shown and if yours was among them it will show up (even if you deleted it seconds later). This also happens if you reply to someone, and they have their Notifications page open in a tab. The tweet would disappear once they refresh the page but your tweet will likely be seen.

See Nine More Tweets sign

Is it better to own your mistake?: If you come across a dodgy tweet you’ve sent and regret it consider if saying so is better than deleting / denying it. Also will it look worse if you’re found to have deleted a tweet and then someone produces a copy of it?

It may all blow over anyway: lots of people mature over the several years they’ve been on Twitter and this progress may be more dramatic depending on how young they were when they joined. It’s not always fair to assume the worst, though of course it does depend on what people have discovered that you’ve written.

2. How to delete a Tweet / undo a ReTweet

Twitter’s help files have a whole page on how to delete a Tweet or undo a ReTweet. After the preamble on that page you’ll find an option to
“View instructions for… [Apple phones] [Android phones] [desktop computers]”

If you delete a DM (Direct Message) it’s deleted only from your own account, not the recipient’s.

3. Search for the unwise Tweets you’ve sent

Note that Twitter no longer shows every single thing in its search results. It can hide tweets it thinks are low value or ones that lots of people have reported as being offensive. Sometimes it shows the ‘best’ or ‘most relevant’ tweets first, so it’s wise to use a range of different search strategies to find Tweets if you suspect they’re there but not appearing in your results.

A basic search might involve searching from:yourname keyword and seeing if there’s anything particularly heinous in there, and deleting it if there is (while bearing in mind my earlier points about screencapping and so on).

As an example here’s everything I’ve ever said about muffins (a lot less than I’d have thought).

From:You to the world

  • My top tweets about muffins from:JoBrodie muffins
  • All my muffin-themed tweets ordered by latest first – from:JoBrodie muffins (achieved by choosing ‘Latest’ from the available options after doing the first search)

If you suspect you’ve sent a dodgy tweet to someone you can include that in your search string.

From:You to someone else

  • If you’ve replied to one of their tweets try – from:YourName to:OtherUser
  • If you’ve replied to several people including them try – from:YourName OtherUser

You can also find all the tweets you sent in 2017, or 2011 or between the 4th and 16th March 2013, using the Advanced Search (in fact I’d recommend familiarising yourself with the Advanced options anyway).

Note that the calendar input used to be be a bit skittish on Advanced Search. I’d previously recommend sticking any old date in then neatening it up on the search results page but it seems to have improved lately.

Twitter Advanced Search

Advanced Search dates uses the YYYY-MM-DD style so 2011-01-01 is 1 Jan 2011 and 2011-11-27 is 27 Nov 2011. I think of this as ‘US style’ but my friend Nick tells me it might be called something else 🙂

You can click on the bold year / month at the top to zoom out or zoom in on a particular year or month range.

Twitter Advanced Search 2011

After you’ve run the search you’ll see something like this, plus a whole load of tweets.

Twitter Advanced Search Results

The oval-shaped search box next to the avatar is where you can manually tinker with the dates. That search results page is linked here, you can adapt it for your search.

Other Tweets you’ve replied to
You might not be able to remember who you’ve sent a reply to, but if you think you’ve agreed with or endorsed someone else’s dodgy tweet then have a think about the sorts of things you might say in reply to them, such as “Typical”, “Agree” or “haha” etc and search for tweets you’ve sent saying that.

ReTweets
I’m afraid I don’t know how you could search for your ReTweets of other people’s tweets. You can certainly Un-ReTweet them (if you’ve found them, see above). If I find out I’ll add it here. Possibly there are more technical solutions (where you interact with Twitter’s API) but that’s beyond this blog and my skill level.

Searching through your own archive
You can download your Twitter archive (you request it by scrolling to the bottom of that page and clicking “Request data”, Twitter packages up your tweets, then revisit the page a bit later and download the zip file they give you) but it’s become much less useful recently. It used to give you a single index.htm file that you could open in a web browser and call up your previous tweets now sitting locally on your computer. You could even click through and read them on Twitter.com (and delete them if you wanted to). It doesn’t seem as straightforward now though and I’ve not really explored this option as a quick way of searching a copy of your tweets.

Twitter Download data

More from Twitter’s help files on How to download your Twitter archive

My friend Lynn wondered about downloading your tweets as a spreadsheet but I’m afraid I don’t know how it’s done – I didn’t even know it was possible (beyond copying a copy of every tweet you or someone else sends to a Google Sheet using IFTTT – note that this only works for tweets sent after you’ve set that up, not previous ones). I’ve got over 100,000 tweets though so I’m keen not to look at them in a spreadsheet format.